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7 Common Mosquito Myths Not to Fall For

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big swarm of mosquitoes

Just the thought of mosquitoes is enough to make us itch. Nothing can ruin a camping trip or neighborhood barbecue faster than these tiny, blood-sucking invaders.

Most people know some of the habits of mosquitoes and are pretty confident in taking measures to repel them. However, as the insect that kills an estimated 725,000 people each year, it’s important to get a solid understanding of the myths and facts about mosquitoes.

Myth 1. Mosquitoes Only Bite at Dusk and Dawn

It’s true that many mosquitoes, including those most common to the United States, are most active at dusk and dawn. However, with 176 species in the United States, there are some species (like the Asian tiger mosquito) that are also active during the day.

Myth 2. All Mosquitoes Bite Humans

When you’re being eaten alive on your annual campout, it sure seems like every possible mosquito is out in full force against you. However, there are actually 3,500 species of mosquitoes and only some of them favor the flavor of humans. Many feed on nectar, reptiles, birds, and other mammals.

Interesting fact: In the species of mosquitoes that feed on humans, it’s only female mosquitoes that are after your blood. Males feed on nectar, but females need the protein found in blood to help with reproduction.

Myth 3. Citronella Is a Great Protection

When you’re out shopping for the summer season ahead of you, you naturally toss a citronella candle in your cart. It’s a necessary component of a successful outdoor summer event, right? Well, yes and no. Citronella candles are pretty ineffective at warding off mosquitoes from your home. While mosquitoes are repelled by crushed leaves of citronella, they aren’t as strongly repelled by the weaker oil that goes into making citronella candles.

Plus, a shift in the wind is all it takes to send the small level of protection elsewhere. So, while they do provide some level of protection, it isn’t sufficient. A preventive mosquito control plan is far stronger than Citronella.

Myth 4. We Don’t Have Mosquito-Borne Illnesses in the United States

Unfortunately, the Asian tiger mosquito, which carries yellow fever, dengue fever, chikungunya, dog heartworm, and West Nile, is found in the United States, particularly in the Eastern and Central states. Additionally, Florida has reported cases of Zika virus in recent years. Fortunately, there are many ways to manage and treat the diseases caused by mosquitoes.

Make no mistake that disease-carrying mosquitoes are still found in the United States. In fact, the only continent that doesn’t play host to mosquitoes is Antarctica.

Myth 5. If You Have a Big Welt, the Mosquito Must Have Had a Big Lunch

Some people think that the bigger the welt, the more blood the mosquito took from your body. However, the size of the bump you receive is not about the amount of blood. It’s actually about your immune system and how it reacts to mosquitoes.

Myth 6. Bats Will Get Rid of All Mosquitoes

It’s true that bats do eat mosquitoes, but they’re actually a small portion of a bat’s diet. And the small size of mosquitoes makes it difficult to for bats to really go after them sufficiently. In fact, if bats have a choice between mosquitoes and another insect, they’ll typically go after the other insect first.

Myth 7. You Don’t Have to Worry About Mosquitoes in the Dry Season

Mosquitoes are much more prevalent and active during wet and rainy seasons, but that doesn’t mean they totally disappear during dry seasons. In fact, dry seasons can be an even more dangerous time for mosquitoes because any standing water will be dirtier during a dry season. Viruses and diseases may, unfortunately, flourish during this time.

The Barefoot Mosquito effectively eliminates breeding spots, treats mosquito resting sites, and prevents their return to your property. Please give us a call today at (512) 402-7121 or request a free mosquito control quote online.

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